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Rugged sea days containing recovery operations on the Rose Rose Oil Business



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Husky Energy was still working as a target date to shed large offshore oil oil that occurred on Friday, but tough days on Saturday and through Sunday afternoon continued to prevent the bride and recovery of about 250,000 liters of oil despite the arrival of the recovery team Sunday afternoon .

CNLOPB updated its website on Sunday said four tracking flights and the offshore support ship have been deployed since Friday afternoon to help assess the extent of the spill and look for the effects on wildlife.

"So far, there have been no affected marine life or seabirds seen by governmental and industrial observers in the ejaculation zone and this route," CNLOPB said. Husky reported that additional wildlife observers were put on the vessel and responded to the spill.

"An updated assessment of the volume and other spill information should be available after the ROV deployment and subterranean testing," said CNLOPB.

Also Sunday, Colin McConnell, spokeswoman for Husky, said the telegram in an e-mail message was around 4 pm. Because Scandi Vinland came to a white rose field and waited for weather conditions to improve so he could start a sub-survey. The waves will be reduced to about four meters before the ROV can be deployed, the spokesman said.

Skandi Vinland was to use her ROVs to locate and assess the damage so that the repair program could begin.

Husky was released on Saturday morning because a flight on air surveillance on Friday identified two oil oils south of the sea. Follow-up water surveillance and aerial surveillance continues.

Husky said he ran the hourly field of white roses every hour, but no other day was reported on oil lenses.

Lightning was located about 50 km south of the field and the Maersk Dispatcher ship is located in the area for wildlife monitoring and monitoring.

Another follow-up flight was scheduled for Sunday afternoon.

Two consecutive buoys were also released on Friday – one from the sea and one from the Atlantic Ocean.

Production still stopped on SeaRose, and a spokesman said everyone on the board is safe.

Ejaculation was identified just as the company's FPSO company was preparing to restart production after Thursday's high winds. The production was closed during Thursday's storm.

Shortly after Friday afternoon, the sea recognized the loss of underground flow pressure as the crew prepared to re-produce, and then the oil was spilled.

The exact volumes have yet to be approved, but the current estimate is 250,000 liters.

In its late Sunday statement, CNLOPB said it was following the situation carefully.

The regulator says it will review Husky's continued response, the company's investigation report, when it is ready and its operational approval, in light of this event, and last year, which dealt with the imminent loss of an iceberg with the SeaServe's FPSO.

The regulator also formally investigate the spill under its powers in accordance with the Atlantic Climate Implementation Agreement, in an effort to confirm the root cause. It will release the findings of its investigation to the public as soon as they become available.

The CNLOPB said it would also "take any enforcement action appropriate to this event.

"Following the oil spills on the white rose field, CNLOPB CEO and senior staff were in contact with other operators in Canada, Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Zone," said the board. "Operations at other facilities will not be resumed until CNLOPB has determined that it is safe to do so.

"The effluence of crude oil in the White Rose field, as energy has been prepared to prepare for the resumption of production, has shown that the risks of offshore oil activity can never be assessed, especially in our harsh environment." "These risks are acceptable only when all reasonable steps have been taken to reduce them."

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Previous story:
Updated: About 250,000 liters of oil spilled into Rose Rose oil field
Raw days continue to prevent the containment and recovery operations

HASAKI ENERGY continues to respond to the offshore oil spill discovered on Friday afternoon, but difficult days on Saturday continue to prevent the containment and recovery of oil spilled.

A spokesman for the Husky Energie said this morning (Saturday) by e-mail that a flight on air surveillance on Friday identified two oil oils south of the sea. Planned flight scheduled for today.

The spokesman said additional launch vehicles would be sent today, including Scandinavian Landland, which will complete a ROV survey of offshore assets after improved weather conditions. Waves will have to be four meters before the ROV can be deployed, the spokesman said.

Two consecutive buoys were also released on Friday – one from the sea and one from the Atlantic Ocean.

Production still stopped on SeaRose, and a spokesman said everyone on the board is safe.

An earlier story:

Husky Energy is coping with oil leaks in its Rose oil oil.

The leak was identified Friday afternoon, just as SeaRose's FPSO was preparing for re-production after Thursday's high winds.

The production was closed during the storm on Thursday, the Husky spokesperson, Colin McCall said in an email to Telegraph.

Shortly after Friday afternoon, the sea recognized the loss of underground flow pressure as the crew prepared to re-produce, and then the oil was spilled.

The exact volumes have yet to be approved, but the current estimate is 250 cubic meters, or 250,000 liters.

The Atlantic waiting ship Hawk was sent to investigate, confirming the fat bolt on the water.

Production is now closed again.

"Every leak is a concern for us," wrote McCall. "We have deployed a coated probe from the Hawk and SeaRose and PAL observation flight is carried out."

Conel said sea states prevent inclusion and recovery, but land crew and contractors have been activated and authorities have been notified.

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