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Scooter fees cut for the "10 million" Lime office



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Lime scooters can bring in more than $ 10 million in Christchurch next year – but the city council can reap less than one percent of that fee.

The Authority is expected to issue a 12-month certification for electronic scooters after the most positive public feedback on the pilot program.

Lime will also be able to expand the fleet from 700 scooters to 1000, giving council members to approve the proposals.

Stuff Have calculated that the firm can rake in more than 10 million, before costs, from the Christchurch business alone over the next 12 months, while paying only $ 86,250 to the city council for the right.

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Lime said it would work "in cooperation" with authority on permits.

Over a quarter of the population of Christchurch has used Lime scooters since they were put on trial in October.

More than 100,000 people have used Lime scooters in Christchurch since October.

Scenes / Scenes

More than 100,000 people have used Lime scooters in Christchurch since October.

At least 400,000 trips were made at the time, which lasted less than 10 minutes when people rode around the central city and Halle Park, the council's data showed.

Conservative estimates based on five-minute campaigns suggest that Lime has earned $ 1 million in revenue since the trial began, while 10 minutes of flights would have earned the company $ 1.6 million.

The Council is considering requiring the Lime an annual approval of approximately $ 86.25 for each scooter, a figure based on similar fees and businesses like bars and cafes have to pay for the use of public spaces.

But that $ 86,500 in revenue for 1000 scooters is a small part of what the company can earn.

The trial revealed that each scooter is used on average seven times a day.

City council can allow 1000 Lime scooters on the streets of Christchurch - which can make the office 10 million next year.

Jack Kirk Anderson / Things

City council can allow 1000 Lime scooters on the streets of Christchurch – which can make the office 10 million next year.

With a five minute drive, it could see Lime take nearly $ 6.4m a year, while a 10-minute drive would earn the company $ 10.2m – more than 100 times the proposed bid for the council.

Lime spokeswoman said: "It's great that Christchurch recognizes how Lime scooters turn to congestion, sustainability, and safety goals.

"We will continue to work in collaboration with the City Council of Christchurch to address the expansion of the permit and achieve the best result for all."

Council members will discuss a report recommending the expansion of the program on Wednesday, before the Council will make a decision at a later date.

The people of Christchurch have taken the scooters to their hearts since they were brought last year when 93 percent of users called for electronic scooters to stay.

A survey of 8000 people also found 75 percent said scooters had a positive impact on the city.

Even Mayor Liana Delziel has become a fan, revealing Stuff That is ready to take the streets after having actually parked in the Hagen Park parking lot.

She said: "The response to the Lime scooter was very positive, and they certainly created the feeling of running the city's central excitement.

"I do not think I saw anyone on a Lime scooter that did not smile, so it just created a sense of fun as well."

Mark of Limes: Electronic scooters have become very popular in New Zealand, so much that Amelie Auberg and Jennifer McPhee spent Christmas racing in the same Christchurch.

David Walker / Stoff

Mark of Limes: Electronic scooters have become very popular in New Zealand, so much that Amelie Auberg and Jennifer McPhee spent Christmas racing in the same Christchurch.

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