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International Epilepsy Day: 8 Signs and Symptoms of Epilepsy You Should Know



International Epilepsy Day, marked on February 11, seeks to raise awareness and educate the general public about the true facts about epilepsy

International Epilepsy Day, marked on February 11, seeks to raise awareness and educate the general public about the real facts about epilepsy. & Photo credit: Thinkstock

New Delhi: According to the Epilepsy Foundation, about 65 million people worldwide live with epilepsy, a chronic neurological disorder in which the brain's activity becomes abnormal causing irreversible seizures. Epilepsy can affect anyone, but it is most likely to affect children under the age of two and adults over 65 years. International Epilepsy Day, marked on February 11, seeks to raise awareness and educate the general public about the true facts about epilepsy. Today it also highlights the urgent need to improve treatment, better treatment and greater investment in research.

Although epilepsy is one of the oldest medical conditions in the world, it is understandable. Therefore, public fear and misconceptions about epilepsy are still persistent, causing discrimination against people with the situation. This means for many people living with epilepsy, discrimination and misconceptions can be more difficult to deal with the situation itself. Learning about epilepsy, including signs and symptoms, can go a long way towards reducing stigma and improving patients' quality of life. Read: International Epilepsy Day: Why Purple is Color Of epilepsy – treatment of seizure disorder

What are the signs and symptoms of epilepsy?

The main symptom of epilepsy is repeated seizures – however, they may be different from person to person depending on the type of seizure. as per Medical News, You must see a doctor if you notice one or more of the following signs, especially if they recur. They include:

  • Twitch without fever or fever.
  • Short spells of darkness, or confused memory.
  • Intermittent fainting spells are accompanied by bladder loss or bowel control.
  • The person does not respond to instructions or questions for a short period of time.
  • The person becomes suddenly rigid for no apparent reason.
  • Mental symptoms such as fear, anxiety – the person may even panic or get angry.
  • Unusual changes in the senses, such as smell, touch, and sound.
  • Uncontrolled movements of arms and legs.

Is there a cure for epilepsy?

The disorder can be caused by various conditions affecting the human brain, although the exact cause is not known in many cases. Some people inherited genetic factors that cause epilepsy to be more likely to occur. However, it is believed that other factors such as head trauma, brain conditions, infectious diseases (AIDS and viral ansliasis), prenatal injury, developmental disorders like autism or neurofibromatosis may increase the risk of epilepsy.

Currently, there is no cure for most types of epilepsy, but treatment, including medication or sometimes surgery, can help manage, in many cases, stop the seizures that occur.

Disclaimer: The tips and suggestions mentioned in the article are for general information purposes only, and should not be construed as professional professional advice. Always consult your doctor or a health care professional if you have specific questions about any medical interest.


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