Monday , October 25 2021

Feel like getting up early? Leonid Meteor shower set for this weekend



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By Scott Systeck / KOMO News

FILE – The early Persian meteorite spotted on 22 July 2017 at Mt. Rainier's Sunrise Point. (Photo: Gowtham Pannala, Inner Eye Photography)

One side in favor of rare November peaceful weather is that the sky will be clear primarily for Leonid meteor shower annual set to peak this weekend.

This meteor shower comes as the Earth passes through the dust trail left behind by Comet Temple-Tuttle, according to SpaceWeather.com. How many years it can do for spectacular displays of fireball meteors, but this year it is not expected to be one of them.

"The earth will break the needle between dense wires and increase a smaller amount of dust," writes Dr. Tony Phillips with SpaceWeather.com.

But still, scientists predict about 15 meteors per hour and every opportunity to see a "falling star", especially in the generally cloudy north-west, should be appreciated.

For this shower, technically at any time between midnight and dawn can be seen them, but the best chance to identify them will be in pre-sunrise hours on Saturday and Sunday – so it is not so "stay up late" event as an "get up early" event. The moon turns around 12:48 am on Saturday morning and around 1:52 on Sunday, and it always helps get that big moon out of the way.

More All you need to know about a meteor shower Leonid

Look at the south-eastern sky to find the Leo stars (why are they called "Leonids") and the meteors seem to originate from there. The best viewing conditions are to find the dark sky away from the city lights. However, there will be some fuzzy fog spots, so valley areas are not the best. The sky is likely to be clearer on Sunday morning than early Saturday morning, as we still clean the gunk from Friday's weather system.

As an added bonus, Phillips points out that there are a few other interesting items. First, there is a new comet that you can identify with binoculars. And Venus – the brightest star in the eastern sky, will be really close to Star Spica.

If you get all of Leonid's photos, we'll be happy to see them! You can send them to [email protected] or post them on our social media channels like Facebook or Twitter.

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